What makes Lookout Mountain home

What's on your summer bucket list? A hike to Glen Falls? A mountain bike ride on the Cloudland Connector Trail? Or maybe a road trip to Nashville to see Alan Shuptrine's new watercolor exhibit?

The season has already kicked off with Community Movie Night. There's another in August and here's 5 reasons you can't miss it. Get ready for the fun, because summers on Lookout are anything but lazy!

Bee City Pollinator Festival a Success

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Betsy Rice, artist

The first Bee City USA Pollinator Festival sponsored by the Lookout Mountain Beautiful Garden Club was a huge success, drawing local residents and people from across the Tennessee Valley.
Volunteers decorated the Lookout Mountain School gym with student artwork detailing pollinators, and there was a wide array of how-to booths staffed by Bee City USA community partners like the Tennessee Aquarium, Crabtree Farms, Reflection Riding and Nature Center, the Tennessee Valley Chapter of Wild Ones, Chattanooga’s chapter of the North American Butterfly Association, The Barn Nursery and the Master Gardeners of Hamilton County. The honeybee hive in a glass case demonstrated by third generation Georgia beekeeper Derick Forester and Sophia Price’s bee beauty products were special treats. Artists Betsy Rice and Ann Caldwell displayed and sold their artwork. Ms. Rice actually auctioned off a painting and donated part of the proceeds to Bee City USA!
Participants learned pollinator gardening techniques from the Tennessee Valley chapter of the Wild Ones and were urged to add butterfly host plants to their gardens to help raise the next generation of butterflies. Everyone was fascinated by the monarch and pipevine swallowtail caterpillars on display, all happily chomping on their host plants.
Lynn Chartier displayed invasive plants and suggested the least toxic way to eradicate them to protect our large trees. Craig Walker from the Barn Nursery offered organic solutions to common yard problems. Both of them stressed the festivals’ theme of creating pesticide-free yards that are healthy places for humans, pets, pollinators and wildlife on the mountain.
Attendees purchased native pesticide-free plants from Reflection Riding and the Wild Ones. Christine Bock-Hunt from the Tennessee Aquarium gave away native coneflowers, coreopsis and phlox so everyone took home pollinator-friendly plants for their yards.
Mayor Carol Mutter and Mayor David Bennett awarded prizes to the winners of the “Why be a Friend to Pollinators” poster contest. The winners from Lookout Mountain School are: Sarah Pettit, first place; Mclean Murray, second place; Mim Roedder, third place. The winners from Fairyland Elementary School are: Camp Lehn, first place; Lucy Heald, second place, and Tulley Brock, third place.
A special thanks to Ruth White, principal of LMS, Coach Rick Dockery and Ginger Birnbaum, president of the PTA, for opening the gym and enthusiastically supporting the festival. The support of this festival showed that Lookout Mountain residents are serious about their commitment to create a more welcoming habitat for native bees, birds, butterflies and other pollinators. The message from this festival on the first World Bee Day is that we are in trouble when the buzzing stops. Hopefully our community will do its part to make sure the buzzing continues for generations to come.

Hike, Bike and Brew

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Mark your calendar for Lula Lake Land Trust’s signature event, Hike Bike and Brew. This unique beer festival allows you to hike or bike on 8 miles of scenic trails to visit beer stations positioned throughout the property. Attendees will receive a commemorative cup to take from station to station for fill-ups by breweries, and they will vote for their favorite to win the title of “Lula Lake’s Favorite Brew.”

Participating brewing company sponsors include OddStory Brewing Company (last year’s winner), Chattanooga Brewing Company, Phantom Horse Brewing Company, Moccasin Bend Brewing Company, Hutton & Smith Brewing Company, Heaven & Ale Brewing Company, Big River Grille & Brewing Works, and Bell’s Brewery.

This year’s beer festival includes the addition of restaurant sponsors. 2 Sons Kitchen & Market, 1885 Grill, Jack Brown’s Beer & Burger Joint, The Tap House, and Bob’s Brick Oven will provide signature bites for attendees. Restaurant booths and a stage will be set up under the big top tent in the Good Shephard Meadow. This year’s entertainment is local band Solar Moonshine. Battlefield Outdoors in Fort Oglethorpe, GA, will be present with bike rentals available.

Local outdoor store, Above the Ridge Outfitters, is sponsoring Hike, Bike & Brew. Above the Ridge Outfitters is located in the heart of historic downtown Ringgold, GA, where they hand pick the brands that have extreme passion, spirit and focus for the outdoors.

Early Bird Tickets for this beer festival are on sale for $50 and ends on July 14 at 11:59 p.m. Week-of tickets are $65. Tickets are limited. Ticket price includes beer, food, and access to 8 miles of trails. All proceeds go toward Lula Lake Land Trust’s mission for conservation, education, and low impact recreation.

Participate in 4th of July Parade

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The City of Lookout Mountain, Ga., and Town of Lookout Mountain, Tenn., are planning the second Annual Fourth of July Parade, and you’re invited to participate! The parade will be a celebration of our unique and close-knit community and capture the charm of Lookout Mountain. The parade is being organized by the Community Activities Committee of Lookout Mountain GA., the (Organizing) Lookout Mountain Chapter of the DAR and Love Lookout.

The parade will consist of truck-towed floats, the town fire truck, a mayoral convertible and more. DAR members and veterans are encouraged to join the parade, as are Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, kids, parents, grandparents ... everyone! Decorate your cars, trucks, bikes and golf carts; play music on a float; Get creative and show your patriotism during this fun community event!

The parade will begin at 10:30 a.m. on July 4 at Fairyland Elementary School and end at the Commons, where there will be food trucks, live music and prizes awarded. If you would like to participate as a driver, musician, biker or in any way, fill out the form at: https://tinyurl.com/lookoutjuly4thparade.
Remember, the success of this event depends on community participation! If you have any questions, email Michelle Workman at workman@jpw.com . To see pictures from last year’s parade go to www.mountainmirror.com.

Commons Camp in Full Swing

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Once again, Lookout Mountains offering summer camp at the Commons. Kids ages 4 and older are invited to attend on weekdays now through July 20. As in years past, Gwin Tugman is in charge of the camp for ages 4-6, that meets from 9 a.m. to 12 noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Scott Shell heads up the camp for ages 6 and older, which is offered every weekday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This is a drop-in camp, so come when you can.

There are many traditions at this long-running camp. On Tuesday and Thursday, we order Mr. T’s pizza, but the children can bring their own lunch if they prefer. Activities include arts and crafts, tennis, baseball, dodgeball and other sports. The children are always closely supervised by the counselors, and their safety is our No. 1 concern. We are planning to have a tennis program on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and a tennis teacher will help the younger campers learn the game through fun activities. Some special days, like water days and cookout day, are highly anticipated by the campers. The older children play many organized games, like chum ball, baseball, ping-pong and more. A high point each year is the end-of-the-season talent show!

The fee is very reasonable. Younger campers pay $10 a day or $90 for the summer; the older campers pay $15 a day, $50 a week or $175 for the summer. To pre-register, make a check out to Lookout Mountain Recreation Board and mail it, along with this form, to Lookout Mountain Recreation Board, PO Box 413, Lookout Mtn., TN 37350, or just fill it out a form when you drop you child off at camp. Contact Scott Shell at (423) 619-4944 or me at (423) 718-3581 with questions.

Lookout Mountain RiverView Inn

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Open House takes place on June 4 & 5.

See Rock City Inc. is excited to announce its purchase of Sky Harbor Court on Lookout Mountain, rebranding the property with a new name: Lookout Mountain RiverView Inn. An open house is set for June 4 and 5, from 3-7 p.m. to showcase the updated space including 10 renovated rooms, pool, Skybox and other amenities.

"We are excited to continue to grow our hospitality business while also demonstrating our unwavering commitment to preserving the iconic history of Lookout Mountain,"said SRC President and COO Susan Harris. "The purchase of Sky Harbor Court, and its subsequent transformation to RiverView Inn is fully part of that commitment, and we look forward to facilitating one-of-a-kind, immersive experiences for our guests."

RiverView Inn is uniquely set along the Tennessee River on Lookout Mountain, with lodging near historic trails, allowing guests to connect with nature and with each other. The property offers breathtaking views of Chattanooga and is conveniently located minutes away from Rock City, Ruby Falls and the Incline Railway.

"RiverView Inn captures the nostalgia of the golden age of 'The American Road Trip' while meeting the needs of today's modern traveler," said Jonathan Humble, innkeeper for RiverView. "With great care we have worked to preserve and refresh the charm and enchantment of the buildings and gardens, a process that will continue over the next several years as we strive to enhance this special place. During this initial phase we focused on refreshing our boutique guest rooms which feature restored vintage furniture and brand new modern bathrooms. This inn serves as a place to relax, restore and explore all that beautiful Lookout Mountain and Chattanooga offers."

SRC purchased the property on Dec. 6, 2016 from Steve and Patsy Evans, who served as its innkeepers for over 20 years. The company has since worked to update the property, while remaining in operation for guests. For more information about RiverView Inn, visit www.stayatriverviewinn.com.

RiverView Inn is located at 2159 Old Wauhatchie Pike in Chattanooga. Call (423) 821-8619 to make a reservation.

Pollinator Festival is May 20

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Buzz-z-z over to Lookout Mountain School Gym on Sunday, May 20, from 1-4 p.m. to discover the world of pollinators. Learn what you can do to safeguard a vibrant future for these tiny creatures on the mountain by planting native plants in your yard. Come rain or come shine, as all the booths and displays will be in the gym. Admission is free.

As a special event for children, Reflection Riding will have hawks, owls, crows and other furry creatures up-close and personal. Everyone can see the actual wildlife that lives on our mountain.

Pollinator artwork from Lookout Mountain School, Fairyland School and Renaissance School will also be on display. The winners of the “Bee a Friend to Pollinators” art contest will be announced at 2 p.m. Lookout Mountain Beautiful Garden Club will award cash prizes to the winners. Face painting and pollinator coloring activities will be available at the Lookout Mountain Beautiful Garden Club booth.

Free gardening advice and planting guides will also be available at the Pollinator Garden, Butterfly Garden and Vegetable Garden booths. Experts from the Aquarium and Tennessee Valley Wild Ones will offer free advice on how to create pollinator-friendly gardens and improve yields from vegetable gardens, so bring a sketch or photos of your yard. Craig Walker from The Barn Nursery will offer organic solutions for common yard and garden problems. Lynn Chartier of the Lookout Mountain Beautiful Garden Club will have a display on invasive plants and offer suggestions on how to eradicate them. Christine Bock-Hunt from the Tennessee Aquarium will give away free native plant seedlings. Reflection Riding will be selling native perennials, shrubs and small trees.

Other booths include:
Butterfly Gardens and how to attract butterfly babies to your yard. Learn about the life cycle of butterflies and what plants can attract these beautiful creatures.
Pollinator Gardens: The Wild Ones will help you chose plants that will attract a variety of pollinators such as bees, butterflies, and birds.
Beekeeper display. Derick Forester, a third-generation beekeeper on the mountain, will have a demonstration hive in a glass case. Honey and bee products for sale.
Vegetable Gardening and Pollinators: Charlene Nash suggest ways to increase yields by improving your soil and by attracting native bees to your garden.
Encaustic art by Betsy Rice: Come watch the artist heat beeswax and resin to create works of art.
Invasive plants on the mountain: A display of invasive plants with Lynn Chartier offering ways to eradicate them.
Organic solutions for common yard problems. Join Craig Walker from the Barn Nursery to learn about products that will not harm children, pets or pollinators.
Bees on a Bicycle: an urban garden center fostering community and creating beauty.
Tours of the Lookout Mountain School Greenhouse.

If you have any questions, email Ann Brown at princeoberon@gmail.com or Candace Chazen at candacechazen@epbfi.com.

Fairyland Festival Set for May 1

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Rainy weather has postponed the much beloved Fairyland Festival to Tuesday, May 1. The forecast calls for sunny skies, snow cones, confetti eggs and pure mayhem.
That’s right, folks, the soggy spring we have had cannot put a damper on the much beloved Fairyland Festival. Now in its 62 year, the Festival promises to bring back all your favorites plus a few new booths sure to delight the whole family. Lazer tag, inflatibles and pony rides are back, as are Mr. T’s pizza, Clumpie’s Ice Creme and Krispy Kremes. New this year is the farmer’s market booth and Two Sons food truck. So don’t worry if you didn’t have time to make it to the grocery store or prepare dinner, the Fairyland Festival has you covered. Kristin Tremain, Festival Chair recently told us about some new exciting shakeups to the old lineup. The swine is gone, but the slime is on. Fairyland faculty members will not be subjected to “kiss the pig”, however students can vote on which faculty member they would like to be slimed. The “sliming” will take place at 6:30 p.m. The festival will begin at 3 p.m. with the presentation of the king and queen and end at 7 p.m. Bring the whole family for food, fun and fancy, while supporting Fairyland School.

Ann Brown Encourages the Community to Save the Bees

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When Ann Brown retired from her position as research librarian for the Memphis school system, she and her husband, Howard, moved to Lookout Mountain to be closer to their daughter, Alicia Oliver, and her family, husband Eric and children Jack, Sarah and Will, all Baylor students. Perhaps she planned to relax and putter about in her garden, but thankfully for this community, she didn’t. It’s true that Ann may love nothing more than digging around in the dirt, but that’s not the root of it.
Upon retirement, Ann earned her certification as a master gardener and became involved with Tennessee Valley Chapter of Wild Ones, an organization for folks interested in landscaping with native plants. There are lots of reasons to plant native plants, one being that they are not invasive. But the main reason Ann is such a proponent of them is because our future depends on them, literally. She is very passionate about this, and she is not referring to the future of anyone’s formal garden.
About 80 percent of the plants in the entire world are dependent on pollinators, and one of every three bites of food we take is the result of pollination. Do you love your brie with a few grapes and a crisp wheat cracker? Forget it if we lose our pollinators. And forget cheddar, half-and-half and Greek yogurt – all dairy requires pollination.
Forty-five percent of the world’s insects have been destroyed, and 40 percent of pollinators face actual extinction. But if Ann Brown has anything to do with it, this is not going to happen.
This petite, attractive lady doesn’t look like a force to be reckoned with, but despite her patient and nonjudgmental way, she is. The muscle behind both Lookout Mountain towns’ designation as Bee City USAs, Ann’s goal is to educate folks about the real danger we are facing. “I’m so impressed with our city councils’ attitude toward our environment – they are so supportive, and care so much about what the mountain is going to become,” Ann said.
You might think it’s enough to buy a mess of plants at a big box garden center and plant them, but it’s not. Neonectoids, a systemic poison that is commonly used by growers, is fatal to all insects. Commonly known as neonics, they are banned in some countries, but are alive and well in the U.S. Ann urges everyone to ask if plants have been treated with neonics before buying them. Supposedly, a few of the big box garden centers will no longer carry plants that have been treated with neonics after this year, or next. For now, there is a section at the Barn Nursery that is pesticide-free, and both Bees on a Bicycle and Reflection Riding offer plants that are free of pesticides.
Monarch butterflies journey twice a year from Canada to Mexico and need fortification along the way. Fifty years ago, clouds of these spectacular insects wafted across Lookout Mountain. Because of development and pesticides, there is a food shortage for these butterflies. Ann is charging each of us with the mission of creating a butterfly garden on our property, or adding pollinator plants to our existing gardens. She will help us achieve this, and actually is responsible for a plethora of workshops at Lookout Mountain’s Pollinator Festival on May 20 at the Commons. One of these upcoming workshops even offers the chance to bring a picture of your existing garden for analysis and recommendations.
“If you build it, they will come,” the famous quote from the movie “Field of Dreams,” is applicable here. And because of the tenacity and commitment and knowledge of Ann Brown, I have no doubt the monarch butterflies will come again. In droves.

Pre-Registration for Lookout Mountain School

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Mark your calendar, pre-registration for LMS is open from 8:30 a.m. until 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday April 11 at Lookout Mountain School located at 321 N. Bragg. Parents of rising Kindergartners will need to bring the following information:
Two proofs of residency: Proofs of residency include a current utility bill (electric, gas water, etc.…). If you have not been at a residence long enough for one billing cycle, a contract on a lease or house will be accepted.
Immunization records: Parents should contact their child’s pediatrician to schedule an appointment for a kindergarten physical. At the time of the physical, the Tennessee Health Card Immunization Certificate will be issued.
Certified Birth Certificate or Social Security Card.
On April 12 all parents of rising kindergarteners are invited to an Incoming Kindergarten Parent Coffee at the LMS Cafeteria from 8:45 a.m. until 9:30 p.m. The coffee, hosted by the PTA board members gives parents a chance to ask questions about the school and find out how to get involved, while the children get a tour of the school and a taste of kindergarten with kindergarten teachers Mrs. Cook and Ms. McKenzie.

Lula Lake Land Trust Announces Conservation Ambassador Program

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The Lula Lake Land Trust is launching the Conservation Ambassador Program designed specifically for young professionals ages 21 – 30. Spearheaded by Matthew Hubbard, the new Director of Development and Communications, this program will focus on teaching the conservation efforts of Lula Lake Land Trust. Selected individuals will tour the core property of Lula Lake Land Trust in addition to on-site visits with other conservation partners, such as Tennessee River Gorge Trust and Lookout Mountain Conservancy, to better understand how conservation organizations work together. Hubbard, a fundraising expert, will also provide experiences in the fields of fundraising and marketing that will directly tie into conservation and the nonprofit sector.
“It is our duty to preserve the wonders around us,” Hubbard states. “Both the engagement of young professionals and the teaching of conservation initiatives are important. The future of conservation relies on choices made today. This comprehensive program is a great resume builder for those looking to gain experience in the environmental or nonprofit field; I’m excited to lead it. Together, we will work toward a better understanding of conservation. I can guarantee it will be eye-opening.”
The Conservation Ambassador Program is now open for young professionals to apply. Space is limited and only a select number of applicants will be chosen. Interested parties should send resumes to matthew@lulalake.org by April 13, 2018.

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