What makes Lookout Mountain home

What's on your summer bucket list? A hike to Glen Falls? A mountain bike ride on the Cloudland Connector Trail? Or maybe a road trip to Nashville to see Alan Shuptrine's new watercolor exhibit?

The season has already kicked off with Community Movie Night. There's another in August and here's 5 reasons you can't miss it. Get ready for the fun, because summers on Lookout are anything but lazy!

How You Can Support Treetop Hideaways

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Pre-Booking Treehouse Nights $275-$350

You can book a night in the treehouse today at sleepinatree.co. We are currently taking
reservations through Airbnb, until we get everything else up and running. Weekdays are $275, Weekends & Holidays are $350 as listed on the booking calendar.

Your Personal Treehouse Retreat $800-$1500

Similar to a timeshare, you can get a block of nights for discounted prices, providing you with a place to go when you want to get away from it all. In this option we provide you with 4 or 8 nights to be used at your discretion within the upcoming year. (additional charges for peak nights and holidays may apply) Availability can be seen at sleepinatree.co/reservations

4 nights at a 26% discount = $800 (total value $1100)

8 nights at a 34% discount = $1500 (total value $2200)

The Corporate Treehouse $2,000

This is an opportunity to position your company in a very unique way. Having special guests, clients, partners, or employees stay in your “corporate treehouse” will make a lasting impression, and says a lot about your organizational culture. This is also a promotional opportunity for you to position your business as a supporter of sustainability as a parter in this project. Here’s what you get:

- 4 treehouse nights to be used for whatever the company would like (rewards, recruiting, company functions).

-a special hospitality package of local goods for each guest

-your company name and logo on the front door of the treehouse during your guest’s stay

-prominent signage at the location listing your company as a founding supporter of the project

-mention as a supporter on our website, in appropriate publications and social media

-bragging rights to backing the world's 1st Living Building Certified Treehouse

-plaque to hang in your office recognizing your Living Building Challenge Certified CorporateTreehouse status

Why I Love Lookout: Michelle Workman

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Michelle Workman knows about the price of fame. While she had built a wildly successful interior design firm in L.A. – designing spaces for the likes of Kirstie Alley, John Travolta, Jennifer Lopez and more – she craved a break from big city life. Fortunately her husband, Justin agreed that a slower pace would be best for their family, particularly their sons, ages 6 and 9. So after an exhaustive search across the country, the family settled on Chattanooga as their new home – more specifically Lookout Mountain.

“I remember feeling like our first realtor tried to talk us out of Lookout Mountain, forcing us to look at houses on Signal and Riverview,” she says. “I think people have this strange idea that it’s very exclusive up here, that nobody is going to be nice to you and you’ll have a hard time making friends. It couldn’t be more opposite of that.”

I think people have this strange idea that it’s very exclusive up here, that nobody is going to be nice to you and you’ll have a hard time making friends. It couldn’t be more opposite of that.

Michelle’s journey to Chattanooga began on a City Data message board, where she stumbled upon another big-city transplant, Christy Falco, who relocated from Miami to Lookout Mountain. After much back and forth online, the two met for coffee on Michelle’s first trip to the mountain. Later, Christy invited Michelle to the Fairyland Club for dinner.

“After that I couldn’t have been more sold on Lookout,” recalls Workman. “Everyone was so open and genuinely interested in getting to know me. I remember thinking it was strange that it didn’t matter that some people lived in Georgia and some in Tennessee. It felt like a single community. In most other areas there would have been dividing lines.”

Growing up in Hollywood, Lookout Mountain was undoubtedly a culture shock – but a welcome one, she says. “It feels like a town that hasn’t moved out of the 1940s – not in style or fashion – but in the sense that everybody is super friendly and loves their neighbor. There’s such a sense of community. Where I’m from, you don’t ask people for favors. But here, if something comes up and you need your child picked up from school, you can call your neighbor.”

After more than two years of researching and discussing, the Workmans officially moved in July of 2013. There have obviously been adjustments. The grocery store is no longer around the corner, and the nearest design center is in Atlanta. Michelle is learning to juggle clients on both coasts while building her business here. Justin’s job as CFO for an internet company requires monthly trips to San Francisco. But whatever hurdles the family has had to overcome, they’re more than happy to accommodate.

There’s a reason it was named Fairyland. I truly believe there is something magical on this mountain.

“I recently asked my son if he was happy where we lived and he said, ‘Mommy, this was the best decision you and daddy have ever made,’” says Michelle. “There’s a reason it was named Fairyland. I truly believe there is something magical on this mountain. I don’t know what it is, but I’m along for the ride.”

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